It’s 2017. I used to think every small business in United States has a website. I was so wrong. According to GoDaddy, 6 out of 10 very small businesses are not online. Geez Louise! What’s going on here. Anyways, for the sake of discussion in this article, let’s assume you HAVE a website.

So, what is your website’s job? Can you answer this question? Most small businesses have trouble with it.

Let me ask you a few other questions:

  • What is your secretary’s job?
  • What is your accountant’s job?
  • What is your HR manager’s job?

These are easy questions. Business owners have no problem answering these because they have a clearly defined job function for each one of them.

Your website is really your employee. It should have a job function just like your accountant or your secretary. And it is your job to identify its function.

  • Is it to provide basic information about your business to prospective clients and customers?
  • Is it to generate leads for your business? In that case, it’d be your sales rep.
  • Do you want your website to be your customer service representative?

What do you want your website to do?

Once you clearly define it’s job function, then you can design it to fulfill that job function.

Not all websites are designed equally. A website should be designed to fulfill its job.

A website who’s job is to merely provide information and a phone number or an email address to reach the business is much simpler and much different than a website who acts as a funnel attracting only qualified leads.

If you are unclear on your website’s function or want to know whether your website is doing its job correctly or not, email me at mayurgudka@gmail.com and I’ll help you answer these questions.

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